The state of Wyoming, just like many states, contains mountainous topography carved with winding road network. You will see several leather-clad residents riding motorcycles. In fact, there is a belief among classmen that two wheels are better than four wheels. Looking at the recent history of motorcycles, you will find that motorcycles have long been an icon of high velocity, rugged freedom and rebellion for good purpose. In Wyoming, owning a classic motorcycle is like a cowboy culture. If you want to join this class of motorcycle fanatics, there are a few things that you will need to understand about Wyoming Motorcycle License.

License Requirements

The following are the requirement for obtaining a Wyoming Motorcycle License:

  • Submitting acceptable forms of identification.
  • Obtain a passing grade on the motorcycle written exam.
  • Successfully pass the on-bike skills test.
  • Pay a $3 fee for the Class M endorsement.

Learning to Ride

To know how to drive a motorcycle, you will need some basic education, in addition to studying the Motorcycle Operator Manual. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation in Wyoming offers two courses that you can take in order to increase chances of receiving a Wyoming Motorcycle License. These courses are categorized as Experienced Rider course and Basic Rider course.

Basic Rider Education Course

The Basic Rider Education course is an on paper training program. The course offers general knowledge about motorcycle riding including safety measures. The sessions of a basic rider education course are conducted on weekends and they contain on-bike training and class work. Those who successfully complete this training are exempted from state testing. The Wyoming DOT provides a list of available sessions.

Experienced Rider Education Course

This is the second course after a basic rider education course. This course is intended for riders with more experience about motorcycle operation. Advanced knowledge means that you have more knowledge about the mechanics of the motorcycle including handling skills. Don’t confuse advanced knowledge to professionalism.